Potato Rows

Potatoes

For potatoes, fertilization programs will differ depending on the use of the crop. Potatoes require a greater amount of Potassium than all other elements. 

As potassium is mobile within the plant, deficiency symptoms can develop on both young and full-sized leaves during periods of extreme deficiency. Leaflets will become crinkled and some leaves will display marginal necrosis. Meanwhile, during more advanced deficiency status, the plant can display symptoms of interveinal necrosis.

In cases of sulfur deficiencies, potato leaves show an overall chlorosis. The veins and petioles display a distinct reddish color, while yellowing is fairly uniform over the entire plant, including young leaves.

Our Crop Vitality product portfolio will successfully address your crop nutrition needs and correct any nutrient deficiencies. Browse our Insights for additional information from our agronomists regarding potato nutrition, field trials and much more.

"What we want to make sure we do is we have some potassium available all the time for that growing crop, and more potassium available during those peak growth demand times."

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